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National Hive

National

The National hive, sometimes called the British Standard National (but British Standard no longer exists) or Modified National. This single walled hive is widely used by beginners as it has long lugs on the frames which make the frames easier to handle. The brood box takes 11 frames 14” wide by 8½” high. It is most convenient to adopt a self spacing Hoffman frame and take up the space left in the brood box with a dummy board.

 

HIVE DATA NATIONAL NATIONAL 14×12 W B C COMMERCIAL
Brood frame 14″ x 8½” 14″ x 12″ 14″ x 8½” 16″ x 10″
Super frame 14″ x 5½” 14″ x 5½” 14″ x 5½” 16″ x 6″
Frames / brood box 11 11 10 12
Cells / brood box 54,000 80,000 49,000 80,000
Lug length 1½” 1½” 1½” 5/8″

 

This amount of comb is adequate for a moderately strong colony but not sufficient for a very prolific colony. However, you can always use two brood boxes, which may make colony inspections more difficult but provides more convenience for swarm control and other hive manipulations.

Alternatively you could use a ‘brood and a half’, that is a brood box plus a super used for brood (not recommended as the two frame sizes are not interchangeable) or you could upgrade to 14” x 12”, a Deep National. The extra depth yields a comb area similar to a Commercial (see 14 x 12 and Commercial pages).

This model of hive therefore has plenty of options to suit your beekeeping.

Nationals usually have a flat roof which can be turned upside down and used to rest hive parts on. The hive is square so hive boxes can be warm way or cold way, i.e. frames sit parallel (warm way) or at right angles (cold way) to the entrance.

The majority of National hives are bottom bee space but they can be manufactured with top bee space.

Diagram of National hive

The National hive

 

News & Events

Pesticide made from spider venom kills pests without harming bees
Funnel-web spiders have neurotoxins in their bite that can kill an adult human yet they might turn out to be our allies if the small hive beetle ever reaches the UK.
Scientists at the University of Durham and Fera Science think the spiders may provide the weapon we need to stop the beetles.
The spider venom contains a cocktail of ingredients and one of them – Hv1a – is toxic to most insects, including the small hive beetle, but does not seem to affect bees or humans.
Hv1a needs to be injected to be effective. Just swallowing the toxin is ineffective as it is degraded in their gut. To get round this the team have bound Hv1a to a molecule from the common snowdrop which effectively carries it through the gut barrier.
In the laboratory the team fed the “fusion protein” in a sugar solution to beetles and their larvae. Within a week, all the beetles and larvae were dead.
Next step was to put beetle eggs on bee comb with brood, and spray with the compound. The honeycomb and bees survived virtually untouched, but most of the new beetle larvae died.
The selfish case for saving bees: it’s how to save ourselves
These crucial pollinators keep our world alive. Yes, they are under threat – but all is not lost.  Click here to read the article.
World’s largest bumblebee under threat.
The Patagonian bumblebee, the worlds largest bumblebee, is under threat from the import of species native to Europe.The growth of the bumblebee trade for agricultural pollination since the 1980s has been identified as one of the top emerging environmental issues likely to affect global diversity.Follow this link to read the article.
Best plants for bees: 5 yr study results by RosyBee
Follow the link to see the results of 5 years of monitoring which bees visit a variety of ‘bee-friendly’ plants.
http://www.rosybee.com/research
What’s that Buzz? Plants hear when bees are coming
New research has shown that plants can ‘hear’ sounds around them and flowers respond to the buzz of approaching bees by producing sweeter nectar. The research biologists from Tel Aviv University played recordings of flying bee sounds to evening primrose flowers and found that after a few minutes the sugar concentration in the flower’s nectar had increased by 20% on average when compared with flowers left in silence or submitted to higher pitched sounds.
The authors of the report say that, for the first time, they have shown plants can rapidly respond to pollinator sounds in an ecologically relevant way.
Producing sweeter nectar in response to the sounds of bees can help entice the insects to visit the flowers and increase the chances of its pollen being distributed.
Thanks to Ann P. for spotting this article in the Times.