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Langstroth

 

Langstroth and Jumbo Langstroth

In 1853 the Rev. L. L. Langstroth of Philadelphia, USA, first described this hive in his book ‘The Hive and the Honeybee’. The essential feature was the systematic adoption of the principal of bee space whereby a gap around the framed combs of 3/16” to 3/8” would prevent the frames from becoming attached to the hive walls. A wider gap would be filled with brace comb and a narrower gap would be filled with propolis. Thus the moveable frame hive was initiated and the principal is still essential in modern hive design. Today the Langstroth hive is probably the most widely used hive around the world, and popular with commercial beekeepers in the UK.

The Langstroth hive is a rectangular, single wall design of external dimensions 20” x 16¼” with 10 short-lugged frames (⅝“ lugs) resting in rebates on the narrow sides.  Top bee space is usually adopted.

HIVE DATA LANGSTROTH JUMBO LANGSTROTH DADANT
Brood frame 17 9/16″ x 9⅛” 17 9/16″ x 11¼” 17 9/16″ x 11¼”
Super frame 17 9/16″ x 5⅜” 17 9/16″ x 5⅜” 17 9/16″ x 6¼”
Frames / brood box 10 10 11
Cells / brood box 61,000 85,000 93,000
Lug length ⅝” ⅝” ⅝”

Cross section of a top beespace hiveThe number of cells available in a single brood chamber is approx. 61,000 making this hive suitable for large colonies, but for prolific colonies a deeper ‘Jumbo’ version is available with approx. 85,000 cells.

The diagram shows a cross section of a top bee space hive with one bee space between frame sides and hive wall, under lugs and above frames.  The bees naturally leave two bee spaces between brood frames so they can work on the frames back to back.
Thus the spacing of frames is also critical, normally 1⅜” (35mm) centre to centre in brood chambers.
Spacing in supers can be varied to suit the conditions, plus the bees usually leave one bee space between adjacent capped frames.

 

 

News & Events

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Read the article HERE.

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Bees normally come out of hibernation in early spring to feast on the pollen of newly blooming flowers. However, they sometimes emerge too early and find that plants are still flowerless and devoid of pollen, which means the bees starve.
Read the article HERE.
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Pesticide made from spider venom kills pests without harming bees
Funnel-web spiders have neurotoxins in their bite that can kill an adult human yet they might turn out to be our allies if the small hive beetle ever reaches the UK.
Scientists at the University of Durham and Fera Science think the spiders may provide the weapon we need to stop the beetles.
The spider venom contains a cocktail of ingredients and one of them – Hv1a – is toxic to most insects, including the small hive beetle, but does not seem to affect bees or humans.
Hv1a needs to be injected to be effective. Just swallowing the toxin is ineffective as it is degraded in their gut. To get round this the team have bound Hv1a to a molecule from the common snowdrop which effectively carries it through the gut barrier.
In the laboratory the team fed the “fusion protein” in a sugar solution to beetles and their larvae. Within a week, all the beetles and larvae were dead.
Next step was to put beetle eggs on bee comb with brood, and spray with the compound. The honeycomb and bees survived virtually untouched, but most of the new beetle larvae died.
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These crucial pollinators keep our world alive. Yes, they are under threat – but all is not lost.  Click here to read the article.
World’s largest bumblebee under threat.
The Patagonian bumblebee, the worlds largest bumblebee, is under threat from the import of species native to Europe.The growth of the bumblebee trade for agricultural pollination since the 1980s has been identified as one of the top emerging environmental issues likely to affect global diversity.Follow this link to read the article.
Best plants for bees: 5 yr study results by RosyBee
Follow the link to see the results of 5 years of monitoring which bees visit a variety of ‘bee-friendly’ plants.
http://www.rosybee.com/research