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Beehaus

 

Beehaus

The Beehaus is based on the same principles as the Dartington hive system but the boxes are manufactured using plastic materials. They are ideal for keeping bees in gardens or on rooftops.

The Beehaus hive system comes complete with all the equipment required to start beekeeping, including four honey boxes, integral mesh floor and varroa inspection tray.

The brood box has entrances at either end and there is enough space to house twenty two 14 x 12 brood frames.

HIVE DATA NATIONAL 14×12 DARTINGTON BEEHAUS
Brood frame 14″ x 12″ 14″ x 12″ 14″ x 12″
Super frame 14″ x 5½” 14″ x 5½” 14″ x 5½”
Frames / brood box 11 21 22
Cells / brood box 80,000 80,000 80,000
Lug length 1½” 1½” 1½”

As with the Dartington hive the colony can be allowed to expand horizontally in the Beehaus and store honey in 14 x 12 frames (ensure your extractor will take this size!). Alternatively the brood chamber can be divided in two to house a second colony such as may be produced during swarm control. After the new queen starts to lay the two colonies can easily be recombined if desired.

Because the bees are on 14” x 12” brood frames (also called Deep Nationals) it should be possible to house a prolific colony on 11 frames i.e. half of the hive. In this case honey storage is provided by the honey boxes being housed above the brood box. Each box is half the size of a National super (and half the weight) and uses National shallow frames.

Diagram of Beehaus hive

The Beehaus has a stainless steel entrance block, for temporarily closing the hive, and a wasp guard that enables the bees to defend their valuable winter stores during the autumn.

The lid and honey boxes are securely held in place by a strong cord which is easily hooked in place at each end of the hive.

The inspection tray is located under the mesh floor of the hive. As with most hives the tray can be removed to allow mites to fall to the ground as part of integrated pest management, or the tray may be inserted to make a count of average daily mite drop for varroa monitoring.

More information at www.omlet.co.uk

 

News & Events

What’s that Buzz? Plants hear when bees are coming
New research has shown that plants can ‘hear’ sounds around them and flowers respond to the buzz of approaching bees by producing sweeter nectar. The research biologists from Tel Aviv University played recordings of flying bee sounds to evening primrose flowers and found that after a few minutes the sugar concentration in the flower’s nectar had increased by 20% on average when compared with flowers left in silence or submitted to higher pitched sounds.
The authors of the report say that, for the first time, they have shown plants can rapidly respond to pollinator sounds in an ecologically relevant way.
Producing sweeter nectar in response to the sounds of bees can help entice the insects to visit the flowers and increase the chances of its pollen being distributed.
Thanks to Ann P. for spotting this article in the Times.
Scientists sew trackers to Asian Hornets to find and destroy nests before they kill honeybees
Britain’s beekeepers are turning to technology to prevent aggressive Asian hornets destroying their colonies. In a first successful trial, experts at the University of Exeter attached tracking devices to the backs of the voracious hornets and then followed them back to their nests.
Asian hornet information
The June edition of the BBKA News has extensive information about the Asian hornet threat. In particular, pages 209 and 210 have full colour reproductions of the Asian hornet alert document issued by the Non Native Species Secretariat (NNSS) for you to cut out and use as your personal guide to identification of this invasive species.
EU agrees total ban on bee-harming pesticides
More information can be found at:          https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/apr/27/eu-agrees-total-ban-on-bee-harming-pesticides?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other