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Beehaus

Beehaus

The Beehaus is based on the same principles as the Dartington hive system but the boxes are manufactured using plastic materials. They are ideal for keeping bees in gardens or on rooftops.

The Beehaus hive system comes complete with all the equipment required to start beekeeping, including four honey boxes, integral mesh floor and varroa inspection tray.

The brood box has entrances at either end and there is enough space to house twenty two 14 x 12 brood frames.

HIVE DATA NATIONAL 14×12 DARTINGTON BEEHAUS
Brood frame 14″ x 12″ 14″ x 12″ 14″ x 12″
Super frame 14″ x 5½” 14″ x 5½” 14″ x 5½”
Frames / brood box 11 21 22
Cells / brood box 80,000 80,000 80,000
Lug length 1½” 1½” 1½”

As with the Dartington hive the colony can be allowed to expand horizontally in the Beehaus and store honey in 14 x 12 frames (ensure your extractor will take this size!). Alternatively the brood chamber can be divided in two to house a second colony such as may be produced during swarm control. After the new queen starts to lay the two colonies can easily be recombined if desired.

Because the bees are on 14” x 12” brood frames (also called Deep Nationals) it should be possible to house a prolific colony on 11 frames i.e. half of the hive. In this case honey storage is provided by the honey boxes being housed above the brood box. Each box is half the size of a National super (and half the weight) and uses National shallow frames.

Diagram of Beehaus hive
Beehaus

The Beehaus has a stainless steel entrance block, for temporarily closing the hive, and a wasp guard that enables the bees to defend their valuable winter stores during the autumn.

The lid and honey boxes are securely held in place by a strong cord which is easily hooked in place at each end of the hive.

The inspection tray is located under the mesh floor of the hive. As with most hives the tray can be removed to allow mites to fall to the ground as part of integrated pest management, or the tray may be inserted to make a count of average daily mite drop for varroa monitoring.

More information at www.omlet.co.uk.

News & Events

‘Bee bricks become planning requirement for new buildings in Brighton’
A planning law introduced in the city of Brighton and Hove, England, calls for new buildings to include special bricks that provide nests for solitary bees.Read the article HERE.The bricks are not without controversy. Read their story HERE.
‘Bees may take generations to recover from one exposure to insecticides’
Study shows reduced reproduction and other negative impacts on performance of speciesIt may take bees multiple generations to recover from being exposed to insecticides even just once, research shows.Although studies have long shown the damaging effects of pesticides for the biodiverse environment, little is known about how much they affect insects in the long term.Read the article HERE
‘No one knew they existed’: wild heirs of lost British honeybee found at Blenheim.

The ‘ecotype’, thought to have been wiped out by disease and invasive species, is thriving in the estate’s ancient woodlands.Read the article HERE

US beekeepers sue over imports of fake
asian honey.

Read the article HERE.

Marks and Spencer project threat to honeybee diversity?

Good thing or bad thing? You decide. Read the article HERE.

Liquid gold: beekeepers defying Yemen war to produce the best honey

Read the article HERE.

Fungus creates fake fragrant flowers to fool bees

Fungi have been discovered making fake flowers that look and even smell like the real thing, fooling bees and other pollinating insects into visiting them.

Read the article HERE.

Spiders Can Fly Hundreds of Miles Using Electricity

Scientists are finally starting to understand the centuries-old mystery of “ballooning.”

Read the secrets HERE

Making a beeline: wildflower paths across UK could save species

Conservation charity aims to help restore 150,000 hectares of bee-friendly corridors to save the insects from extinction.

Read the article HERE.