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Dadant

Dadant

Charles Dadant emigrated from France to America in 1863. He invented the original Dadant hive which accommodated 10 large frames.

The Modified Dadant (MD) was developed in 1917 from the original Dadant hive and consists of a larger brood box to accommodate 11 slightly smaller frames which are similar to those used in the Jumbo Langstroth hive.

This arrangement gives 93,500 brood cells, making the MD hive the largest standard hive in use in this country. The external dimensions of the brood chamber are 20” x 18½” x 11¾” high, and like the Langstroth, the MD is top bee space with the short lugged frames resting in a rebate cut into the thickness of the narrower sides. Note that the Dadant brood frames are at 1½” spacing (38mm).

Shallow frames are 6¼” high and a super will hold 11 Hoffman frames or 10 Manley frames.

HIVE DATA LANGSTROTH JUMBO LANGSTROTH DADANT
Brood frame 17 9/16″ x 9⅛” 17 9/16″ x 11¼” 17 9/16″ x 11¼”
Super frame 17 9/16″ x 5⅜” 17 9/16″ x 5⅜” 17 9/16″ x 6¼”
Frames / brood box 10 10 11
Cells / brood box 61,000 85,000 93,000
Lug length ⅝” ⅝” ⅝”

Brother Adam at Buckfast Abbey in Devon designed the Buckfast Dadant hive in the 1920s. This consists of 12 standard Dadant frames in the brood chamber and is bottom bee space. The sloping roof design throws off rain water more efficiently than a flat roof but still maintains a flat surface for resting hive parts on (see diagram). When taken to the heather the hives are held together with a metal rod down the centre.
Four of these hives are placed in a square pattern with the entrances oriented north, east, south and west with the beekeeper working the hives from the centre of the square.

Buckfast Dadant Hive

Diagram of Buckfast Dadant hive

 

News & Events

What’s that Buzz? Plants hear when bees are coming
New research has shown that plants can ‘hear’ sounds around them and flowers respond to the buzz of approaching bees by producing sweeter nectar. The research biologists from Tel Aviv University played recordings of flying bee sounds to evening primrose flowers and found that after a few minutes the sugar concentration in the flower’s nectar had increased by 20% on average when compared with flowers left in silence or submitted to higher pitched sounds.
The authors of the report say that, for the first time, they have shown plants can rapidly respond to pollinator sounds in an ecologically relevant way.
Producing sweeter nectar in response to the sounds of bees can help entice the insects to visit the flowers and increase the chances of its pollen being distributed.
Thanks to Ann P. for spotting this article in the Times.
Scientists sew trackers to Asian Hornets to find and destroy nests before they kill honeybees
Britain’s beekeepers are turning to technology to prevent aggressive Asian hornets destroying their colonies. In a first successful trial, experts at the University of Exeter attached tracking devices to the backs of the voracious hornets and then followed them back to their nests.
Asian hornet information
The June edition of the BBKA News has extensive information about the Asian hornet threat. In particular, pages 209 and 210 have full colour reproductions of the Asian hornet alert document issued by the Non Native Species Secretariat (NNSS) for you to cut out and use as your personal guide to identification of this invasive species.
EU agrees total ban on bee-harming pesticides
More information can be found at:          https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/apr/27/eu-agrees-total-ban-on-bee-harming-pesticides?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other