WBC

 

WBC

The WBC hive was designed in 1890 by William Broughton Carr. It is classified as a double walled hive and is the iconic image of a hive, usually painted white.

The inner boxes are made of thinner timber than the National, making it lighter.

The WBC brood chamber takes 10 long lug frames compared to 11 in the National hive. The frames are identical. Similarly the WBC supers take up to 10 National super frames.

 

HIVE DATA NATIONAL NATIONAL 14×12 W B C COMMERCIAL
Brood frame 14″ x 8½” 14″ x 12″ 14″ x 8½” 16″ x 10″
Super frame 14″ x 5½” 14″ x 5½” 14″ x 5½” 16″ x 6″
Frames / brood box 11 11 10 12
Cells / brood box 54,000 80,000 49,000 80,000
Lug length 1½” 1½” 1½” 5/8″

The outer boxes or lifts act as protection for the inner hive. Thus there is double the amount of work moving boxes during inspections. This is offset to some extent by the extra protection afforded by the lifts.

WBC hives have the same capacity problem as Nationals so it is not surprising that a WBC brood box may be purchased to take 14 x 12 frames (note that an extra lift will be required). Or you could use double brood boxes for prolific colonies.

Other points to take into consideration:

  • The pitched roof makes it difficult to turn upside down and rest hive parts on but the lifts can be removed, stacked to one side and used instead.
  • The protected inner boxes do not need paint or other wood preserver.

This is a typical WBC hive with sliders to vary the entrance width.

WBC hive with sliding entrance blocks

 

News & Events

Outbreak of EFB reported
An outbreak of EFB has been reported by one of our members about ‘5km east of Hawkchurch’. If you live in the area and are not yet on BeeBase we would recommend you go to the BeeBase website as soon as possible to register. This will ensure you are informed of any threats in your area.
World’s largest bumblebee under threat.
The Patagonian bumblebee, the worlds largest bumblebee, is under threat from the import of species native to Europe.The growth of the bumblebee trade for agricultural pollination since the 1980s has been identified as one of the top emerging environmental issues likely to affect global diversity.Follow this link to read the article.
Best plants for bees: 5 yr study results by RosyBee
Follow the link to see the results of 5 years of monitoring which bees visit a variety of ‘bee-friendly’ plants.
http://www.rosybee.com/research
What’s that Buzz? Plants hear when bees are coming
New research has shown that plants can ‘hear’ sounds around them and flowers respond to the buzz of approaching bees by producing sweeter nectar. The research biologists from Tel Aviv University played recordings of flying bee sounds to evening primrose flowers and found that after a few minutes the sugar concentration in the flower’s nectar had increased by 20% on average when compared with flowers left in silence or submitted to higher pitched sounds.
The authors of the report say that, for the first time, they have shown plants can rapidly respond to pollinator sounds in an ecologically relevant way.
Producing sweeter nectar in response to the sounds of bees can help entice the insects to visit the flowers and increase the chances of its pollen being distributed.
Thanks to Ann P. for spotting this article in the Times.
Scientists sew trackers to Asian Hornets to find and destroy nests before they kill honeybees
Britain’s beekeepers are turning to technology to prevent aggressive Asian hornets destroying their colonies. In a first successful trial, experts at the University of Exeter attached tracking devices to the backs of the voracious hornets and then followed them back to their nests.
Asian hornet information
The June edition of the BBKA News has extensive information about the Asian hornet threat. In particular, pages 209 and 210 have full colour reproductions of the Asian hornet alert document issued by the Non Native Species Secretariat (NNSS) for you to cut out and use as your personal guide to identification of this invasive species.